New York Photo Review
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Making Caribbean Dance by Susanna Sloat
The Genetic Wars by Barbara Confino
Soho Photo Gallery
Central Booking Magazine

Left Behind

What They Left Behind
Ed Barnas
 by Marc Tauss. Source: Marc Tauss
Marc Tauss 2000

What We Leave Behind, curated by James Brookens, offers three takes on the physical evidence we leave behind on passing.

The first is a group of thirteen black & white photographs Marc Tauss made of the apartment inhabited for 58 years by his uncle (Charles Francis Tauss), an artist, collector, and conservator, prior to his death in 2000. Before losing touch with his uncle, Marc had been to the apartment only twice and had memories of a place of wonder, neatly filled with many objects. These images document the disarray left behind after many years of living alone as well as the decay evident in poorly maintained rental buildings (e.g., the photos of the bathroom wall). What raises these images above the level of out takes from Hoarders, however, are the little touches in the photos. In particular, I liked the bookending of the series with an image of passport photos (his uncle?) on a bookshelf at one end, and a photo of the hearse at the other end.

Ballerina by Dudley Reed. Source: Dudley Reed
Dudley Reed, "Ballerina"

Dudley Reed’s contribution showcases the assemblages by Norman Hasselriis, a poet, sculptor, and child of Dada who past away in 2005. In conversations with Norman’s daughters, Dudley offered to take some photographs of the collection. Eight color portraits of individual assemblages are on display here. Well lit and isolated in a formal studio context, the assemblages spring to life. I especially liked the dancer created from a pair of scissors and piece of cloth. [It would have been an interesting exercise to see how Marc would have documented Norman’s studio and Dudley would have photographed Charles’ artwork.]

Alan MacWeeney’s contribution consists of five large color prints featuring stonewalls and landscapes in Ireland and the Aran Islands. The viewpoint moves from mid (hobbled sheep by a wall, a fox in a culvert) to far distance, the images quite lovely to behold. Stonewalls, built up over centuries and maintained over time, are the common element. However, I found these images a bit out of place in this show. While they show the remains of human activity that activity is over such a long time scale that it contrasts jarringly with the intimate, personal connection with the subject of the other work on display.


What They Left Behind


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The Genetic Wars by Barbara Confino
Making Caribbean Dance by Susanna Sloat
Central Booking Magazine
Soho Photo Gallery