New York Photo Review
from the NYPR Archives

Making Caribbean Dance by Susanna Sloat
The Genetic Wars by Barbara Confino
Soho Photo Gallery
Central Booking Magazine

The Body Redefined

Exposed
Ed Barnas
Carla van de Puttelaar

The subject of this group show is the representation of the human body and each of these four photographers takes a markedly different approach. I had seen the work of three of these artists exhibited at the Klompching Gallery before, but Carla van de Puttelaar’s work was a new addition.

Carla van de Puttelaar’s images, from her Cranach series, are the most traditional: three very vertical, full length images of young women seemingly floating in space against a dark background, colors muted and details sharp. With their eyes closed and heads turned to the side, away from the viewer, as if asleep, all are nude except for brief bottoms in two images. One senses vulnerability in the subjects and feels a bit of trepidation at intruding on their rest. While available in a 31x81 size, the prints on display were 12 x 31, a size I felt more appropriate to the subject.

 by unidentified photographer.
Anthony Crossfield

Phillip Toledono’s five portraits are intimidatingly large, 40x30 or 60 x50 inch prints ranging from head and shoulders to waist up, creating a sort of hyper-reality with every pore and facial hair sharp. Though they confront the viewer directly, the subjects themselves do not intimidate; rather, there is a feeling of tentativeness. These individuals are redefining themselves through extensive surgical “work” and their bodies are in transition. Sometimes the face does not quite match the sculpted body, though when viewed as a group the facial similarities are vaguely disturbing.

Anthony Crossfield’s four large photographic fabrications merge a pair of disparate nude male bodies into one multilimbed creature, sometimes with both bodies working together, sometimes at odds with each other. It is a technically challenging concept and well executed. However, while I found the images interesting, they did not evoke an emotional response in me.

Cornelia Hediger is represented by one image from her Doppelganger series of self-portraits. Assemblages of six photos in a 2 x 3 grid, they show different parts of a tableau vivant in which Cornelia adopts the role of a character and her doppelganger. In the 26x26 in. image on display, a woman stands by a bureau while her doppelganger stands beside her disrobing. The six images together present the full scene but with some overlap and mismatch at the edges of the overlaid black grid – a grid which, incidentally, creates the impression of viewing the scene through a window.


Exposed


Klompching Gallery
111 Front St. 2nd Fl
Dumbo Brooklyn         Map

212 796 2070
klompching.com

Wednesday, March 16 to
Friday, April 22, 2011
Hours: Weds to Sat, 11 to 6
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The Genetic Wars by Barbara Confino
Making Caribbean Dance by Susanna Sloat
Central Booking Magazine
Soho Photo Gallery