New York Photo Review
from the NYPR Archives

Making Caribbean Dance by Susanna Sloat
The Genetic Wars by Barbara Confino
Soho Photo Gallery
Central Booking Magazine


AIPAD Photography Show New York
Reviewer #1
Edward Steichen, “The Flatiron”

The biggest event of the photography collecting year is returning to the Armory this weekend. AIPAD (that’s the Association of International Photography Art Dealers, not to be confused with the similarly glorious Apple computing device) is a collector’s show with 81 galleries from as far away as Beijing, Buenos Aires, Osaka, Jerusalem and Brooklyn. This is a big event, especially for the out of town galleries, and they generally have their choicest stock on display.

The bread and butter of most galleries are the 20th century classics of American and European Art photography – you will not have far to go to find your second Ansel Adams “Moonrise” or your next Henri Cartier-Bresson. Weegee, Walker Evans, Robert Frank and all the others are well represented by multiple galleries. This viewer however, is always fascinated by the new and relatively unknown work that adventurous (or less well capitalized) galleries display.

Big color prints are much in evidence. Particularly appealing were photographs by Lisa Pardington at the booth of Scottsdale Arizona dealer Lisa Sette. These straight-on photographs of 19th century phrenology busts (with the various areas of the skull marked and labeled) are hung alongside photographs of life-casts of the heads of Maori tribesmen, also done around the same time, their scars and tattoos accentuated to startling effect.

Another anthropologically themed set of work, new to me, by Polish photographer Katarzyna Mirczak can be seen at the Eric Franck Fine Art (London) booth. It consists of a large grid of moderately sized photographs, each showing a glass specimen jar containing a tattoo removed from the body of a Polish prisoner in the late 19th and early 20th century. Fascinating for the range of tattoo art, some of it explicitly pornographic, and for the insight into the mindset of collectors! The same booth also features some beautifully crafted Photoshop images of animals in Indian palaces and temples by Karen Knorr.

Speaking of Photoshop, a number of galleries featured work that was either coyly or explicitly pushing the boundaries of the traditional photograph. The glittery portraits and self-portraits by Ayano Sudo at the Picture Photo Space (Osaka) booth were particularly sparkling.

Arno Minkkinen is hardly an unknown, but he seemed to be everywhere at this year’s show, most notably with a very large image of hands opening a window over a cityscape at the Robert Klein (Boston) booth, and two unusual color images of doorways at Yancey Richardson.

Jeff Brouws’ big color pictures were also displayed at several galleries, particularly his set of super-saturated, “Freshly Painted Houses” at the Robert Koch (Boston) booth (moderately sized) and the Robert Mann booth (pretty big.)

Finally, way off in the corner at the June Bateman booth, it was good to see the work of Gail Thacker. A small grid of her chance-enhanced original Polaroid prints included choice work from the 1980’s and 90’s when she was a key player in the ‘Boston School’ of photographers.

 by unidentified photographer.
Weegee, “The Critic”

As always the AIPAD show rates an easy 5 stars, and is a must for anyone hoping to get a grip on the gallery scene today.

AIPAD Photography Show New York by Don Burmeister

Share

The Genetic Wars by Barbara Confino
Making Caribbean Dance by Susanna Sloat
Central Booking Magazine
Soho Photo Gallery